Edit in JSFiddle

var person = {
		name: 'Nazmus',
    city: 'Boston',
    state: 'Massachusetts',
    website: 'EasyProgramming.net',
    language: 'JavaScript',
    job: 'Developer',
    hair: 'Black',
    eyes: 'Brown',
    hands: 'Two',
}

var output = document.getElementById("output");

output.innerHTML += JSON.stringify(person) + '<br />';

var str = '{"name":"Nazmus","city":"Boston","state":"Massachusetts","website":"EasyProgramming.net","language":"JavaScript","job":"Developer","hair":"Black","eyes":"Brown","hands":"Two"}';

var obj = JSON.parse(str);

for(p in obj){
		output.innerHTML += obj[p] + '<br />';
}
<!-- JavaScript Objects - JSON.parse() & JSON.stringify() #43 -->
<p>
Welcome to the 43rd Easy JavaScript tutorial, part of <a href="http://www.easyprogramming.net">EasyProgramming.net</a>. We've learned a lot about JSON and custom objects in JavaScript. Let's keep going and learn about <code>JSON.parse()</code> and <code>JSON.stringify()</code>!
</p>
<p>
When you send data to or receive data from a web server, the data is always in a string format. But there are ways to send entire objects back. You can send it all as a string with <code>JSON.stringify()</code> and use <code>JSON.parse()</code> to parse it back into JSON on your script. 
</p>
<p>
One thing to note is when you're using JSON.parse(), the formatting of the string MUST be in JSON format, otherwise, you will get a syntax error. You cannot parse string that doesn't look like JSON. Let's take a look!
</p>

<h2>
Syntax of <code>JSON.stringify()</code>:</h2>

<p>
<code><pre>
var obj = {
      name: "Nazmus",
      city: "Boston"
   };

JSON.stringify(obj); //outputs the object as a long string
  </pre>
</code>
</p>
<h2>
Syntax of <code>JSON.parse()</code>:</h2>
<p>
<code><pre>
var str = '{name: "Nazmus",city: "Boston"}';
JSON.parse(str); //outputs object version of str
  </pre>
</code>
</p>

<p>
<h2>
Let's practice:</h2>
<span id="output"></span>
<br /><br />